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 Marushin Model# S004 A6M3-32 Zero - Q108 - 2nd Kōkūtai, Buna Airfield 1942 - code name Hamp (clipped wing)

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Kyushu J7W

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PostSubject: Marushin Model# S004 A6M3-32 Zero - Q108 - 2nd Kōkūtai, Buna Airfield 1942 - code name Hamp (clipped wing)    Thu Feb 23 2017, 21:32



A6M3-32 Zero - Q108   
Producer Marushin ( This diecast line is occasionally active, but releases are limited )
Scale 1/48
Model Number S004
A6M3-32 Zero - Q-108    2nd Kōkūtai,  Buna Airfield 1942 - code name Hamp (clipped wing)  




Marushin diecast are impressive pieces of  metal. Very little plastic, solid, great panel lines but completely bereft of cockpit detail. They need to be assembled but this as a rule is easily done. Saves on box storage space. Other that the Willow I encountered few snags that were not worked through with very basic modeling skills and a small screwdriver and swiss army knife. The canopies are snap in arrangements but a drop of clear elmers glue holds them in place. Some owners have used 1.48 plastic A6M model cockpit interiors and created astonishing detail to flesh out their Marushins, but I personally have never attempted this. The landing gear is also sparse on detail but not so noticeable. Cannon, machine guns and pitot tubes are metal rods and should be painted. The rods can take a bit of filing down to place within the wings. Still this is more than worth the effort.



Marushin picked this one for a reason. There were relatively intact A6M3's with good photos  captured on the same strip.   The owner of Marushin has a connection to the IJNAF via a relative who served in the war based on a story I read. With the passing of his generation the company focuses on their airsoft replica rifles and pistols. The molds appear to be in their personal possession vs a Chinese producer. This possibly accounts for the occasional re- release of some models. This one does not show up very often on the web or ebay. Most online distributors are long out of stock.



Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 32
Type:           Fighter
Service: Japanese Navy Air Force (JNAF)
Crew:        1 pilot




Specifications:
       Length:         29' 8.75" (9.06 m)
       Height:         11' 6" (3.509 m)
       Wingspan:       36' 1" (11 m)
       Wing area:      21.3 sq. ft (229.27 sq. m)
       Empty Weight:   3984 lbs (1807 kg)
       Loaded Weight:  5609 lbs (2544 kg)
       Max Weight:     n/a



Propulsion:
       No. of Engines: 1
       Powerplant:     Nakajima NK1F Sakae 21 14-cylinder radial
       Horsepower:     1130 hp at takeoff




Performance:
       Range:          1284 naut miles (1477 st miles)
       Cruise Speed:   200 mph (230 kt)
       Max Speed:      338 mph  at 19685 ft (294 kt at 6000 m)
       Climb to/in:    19685 ft (6000 m) in 7 min 1 sec
       Ceiling:        36250 ft (11050 m)




Armament:      
Two 7.7mm Type 92 machine guns in the nose
TwoType 99 cannon in the wings
One 500 kg bomb



                                Trajectory of Zero MG vs 20MM cannon.
The machine guns, were of comparatively low muzzle velocity and built like British Vickers. They had a free-firing rate of 600 rounds per min., but since they were electrically synchronized to fire through the propeller, their actual rate was much lower. The 20-mm. cannon were also of fairly low muzzle velocity and set outside the propeller arc to fire 100 rounds per minute.


The Mitsubishi A6M Zero was a lightweight fighter aircraft operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service (IJNAS) from 1940 to 1945. The origin of its official designation was that "A" signified a fighter and "6" for the sixth model built by Mitsubishi ("M"). The A6M was usually referred to by the Allies as the "Zero"—a name that was frequently misapplied to other Japanese fighters, such as the Nakajima Ki-43.



In early combat operations, the Zero gained a legendary reputation as a dogfighter, achieving the outstanding kill ratio of 12 to 1.   By mid-1942 a combination of new fighter tactics developed before and after an intact example was captured in the Aleutians and the introduction of better equipment enabled the Allied pilots to engage the Zero on generally equal terms.  By 1943, inherent design weaknesses and the failure to develop more powerful aircraft engines meant that the Zero became less effective against newer Allied fighters, which possessed greater firepower, armor, and speed, and approached the Zero's maneuverability.  




More importantly many highly experienced Japanese aviators and squadron leaders were lost in combat, during 1942 & 1943 resulting in a progressive decline in pilot quality, which became a significant factor in Allied successes.  Unexpected heavy losses of pilots at the Battles of the Coral Sea and Midway along with the grinding attrition around Guadalcanal dealt the Japanese carrier air force a blow from which it never fully recovered.



Although the Mitsubishi A6M was outdated by 1944, design delays and production difficulties of newer Japanese aircraft types meant that it continued to serve in a front line role until the end of the war and in the hands of the few remaining expert pilots it was still deadly.  During the final year of the War in the Pacific, the Zero was also adapted for use in kamikaze operations. During the course of the war, Japan produced more Zeros than any other model of combat aircraft

A6M3 Type 0 Model 32




The A6M3 model of the Japanese Zero fighter was designed as an improvement to the earlier A6M2 design.  In 1941, Nakajima introduced the Sakae 21 engine, which used a two-speed supercharger for better altitude performance, and increased power to 840 kW (1,130 hp). A prototype Zero with the new engine was first flown on July 15, 1941.  This would evolve into the  A6M3 Model 32.

The new Sakae was slightly heavier and somewhat longer due to the larger supercharger, which moved the center of gravity too far forward on the existing airframe. To correct for this, the engine mountings were cut back by 185 mm to move the engine toward the cockpit. This had the side effect of reducing the size of the main fuselage fuel tank (located between the engine and the cockpit) from 518 l (137 US gal) to 470 l (120 US gal). The cowling was redesigned to enlarge the cowl flaps, revise the oil cooler air intake, and move the carburetor air intake to the upper half of the cowling.




The wings were redesigned to reduce span, eliminate the folding tips, and square off the wingtips. The inboard edge of the aileron was moved outboard by one rib, and the wing fuel tanks were enlarged accordingly to 420 l (110 US gal). The two 20 mm wing cannon were upgraded from the Type 99 Mark l to the Type 99 Mark II, which required a bulge in the sheet metal of the wing below each cannon. The wings also included larger ammunition boxes and thus allowing 100 rounds per cannon.



The Sakae 21 engine and other changes increased maximum speed by only 11 km/h (6.8 mph) compared to the Model 21, but sacrificed nearly 1,000 km (620 mi) of range. Nevertheless, the navy accepted the type and it entered production in April 1942.

The shorter wing span led to better roll, and the reduced drag allowed the diving speed to be increased to 670 km/h (420 mph). On the downside, turning and range, which were the strengths of the Model 21, suffered due to smaller ailerons, decreased lift and greater fuel consumption. The shorter range proved a significant limitation during the Solomons Campaign, during which Zeros based at Rabaul had to travel nearly to their maximum range to reach Guadalcanal and return. Consequently, the Model 32 was unsuited to that campaign and was used mainly for shorter range offensive missions and interception.



The appearance of the redesigned A6M3-32 prompted the US to assign the Model 32 a new code name, "Hap".
The official Allied code name became "Hamp", in keeping with the practice of giving male names to Japanese fighters, female names to bombers, bird names to gliders, and tree names to trainers. "Zeke" was part of the first batch of "hillbilly" code names assigned by Captain Frank T. McCoy of Nashville, Tennessee (assigned to the Allied Technical Air Intelligence Unit (ATAIU) at Eagle Farm Airport in Australia), who wanted quick, distinctive, easy-to-remember names. When, in 1942, the Allied code for Japanese aircraft was introduced, he logically chose "Zeke" for the "Zero." Later, two variants of the fighter received their own code names: the Nakajima A6M2-N (floatplane version of the Zero) was called "Rufe" and the A6M3-32 variant initially called "Hap".  This name was short-lived, as a protest from a very unhappy USAAF Commanding General Henry "Hap" Arnold forced a change to "Hamp". Soon after, it was realized that it was simply a new model of the "Zeke" and was termed "Zeke 32". This variant was flown by only a small number of units, and only 343 were built.  



A great WWII training film starring Ronald Regan on how to recognize the Zero.



Just click on the Utube link.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_jJB23V7tM

 He stars as Lieutenant Jimmy Saunders (Ronald Reagan) learns how to tell a US P-40 from a Japanese A6M Zero fighter the hard way. (That's a very angry Craig Stevens aka "Peter Gunn" on the receiving end.) Contains plenty of interesting info about what US pilots were told about Japan's most produced and feared fighter and how to spot it. Includes rare footage of a captured Zero doing spectacular aerobatics. This was the Zero recovered in the Aleutians used in the film.




Flotation Gear

Hamp's had flotation gear for overwater operations consisting simply of a large water-proof canvas bag in the aft fuselage section. This was connected to a tube leading to a barrel-type valve on the left side of the cockpit. Thus, when faced with a forced water landing, the pilot opens the valve, allowing the bag to be inflated by pressure of the air rushing in through the intake, with the valve being closed when the bag is fully inflated. Additional flotation gear was built into Hamp's wing through two airtight compartments formed by sealing off two boxes, one formed by the front and rear spar and wing ribs 8 and 22, the other formed by the front spar, leading edge and ribs 8 and 23.



Captain Eric Brown, the Chief Naval Test Pilot of the Royal Navy, recalled being impressed by the Zero during tests of captured aircraft. "I don't think I have ever flown a fighter that could match the rate of turn of the Zero. The Zero had ruled the roost totally and was the finest fighter in the world until mid-1943." American test pilots found that the Zero's controls were "very light" at 320 kilometres per hour (200 mph), but stiffened at faster speeds (above 348 km/h, or 216 mph) to safeguard against wing failure. The Zero could not keep up with Allied aircraft in high-speed maneuvers, and its low "never exceed speed" (VNE) made it vulnerable in a dive. While stable on the ground despite its light weight, the aircraft was designed purely for the attack role, emphasizing long range, maneuverability, and firepower at the expense of protection of its pilot. Most lacked self-sealing tanks and armor plating




Aircraft History & photos courtesy of Pacific wrecks web site.

Formed on May 31, 1942. Commanded by Commander Sakae Yamamoto. The air group was a composite air group which operated D3A dive bombers and A6M fighters. All aircraft bore tail code Q-XXX (three digit). The unit first operated under the Combined Fleet, then under the 8th Fleet at Rabaul.

On August 6, 1942 the Yawata Maru (Unyō) deivered fifteen A6M3 Model 32 Zeros to Lakunai Airfield near Rabaul. Their first interception was the next day against 5th Air Force B-17s. On August 22, a detachment flew to Buna Airfield where after 2 weeks of combat it was withdrawn with heavy losses on the ground.



The Buna base was attacked by P-39's and B-26 Marauders.  When the base was captured even these wrecks were scavenged to provide parts for the repair of more intact finds by the Australian TAIU units.   The A6M3 was used heavily in New Guinea and at Rabaul where its short legs were not as much of an issue.

A little mystery.   Why pick Q-108 that was a burned out wreck to be the representative of this variant?  




A6M3 Model 32 Zero Manufacture Number 3042 Tail Q-108 - Built by Mitsubishi during July 1942. had a Houkoku Number of 884 (patriotic presentation or donation number), the donor details are unknown. MArushin shows a number of 878.    People and companies in Japan sponsored aircraft just like people in the USA did . When the Navy received such an aircraft the sponsors name was included on the fuselage side.   Assigned to 2nd Kokutai. Painted olive gray with red tail number, outlined in white. Assigned to the 2nd Kōkūtai, it operated from Buna Airfield (Old Strip).  I will try to get the kanji translated.   Can anyone out there translate it?  Could it be an ancestor of todays Marushin Company sponsored a plane in WWII ?   The anchor looking symbols translate as mountain and the three line symbol in between is for 3 but combinations often mean something else.





It was destroyed on the ground at Buna Airfield (Old Strip) with the center section burned out. Captured by Allied forces as of December 5, 1942. On the tail only '08' is visible.

On August 14, 1942 three A6M3 Model 32 Zeros from the Tainan Kokutai, 2nd Shotai: Lt(jg) Takeyoshi Ono, FPO1c Sadao Yamashita, FPO3c Masami Arai landed at Buna Airfield. At 7:35 they intercepted B-17E "Chief Seattle" 41-2656. During the attack, Lt(jg) Takeyoshi Ono's Zero was damaged by defensive fire from the bomber.


noticed the radio mast askew & fixed it in other pics

On August 22, 1942 a detachment of A6M3 Zeros from the 2nd Kokutai and Tainan Kokutai from Lakunai Airfield arrived at Buna Airfield. On August 24, 1942 eight D3A2 Val dive bombers from the 2nd Kokutai (Bomber Buntaï) led by Lt Inoue arrived at Buna Airfield.

Japanese units based at Buna Airfield transferred from Rabaul
2nd Kokutai (A6M3 Hamp buntaï)  August 22 - September 8, 1942
2nd Kokutai (D3A2 Val buntaï)  August 24 - 28, 1942
Tainan Kokutai (A6M3 Hamp buntaï)  August 22 1942
47th Anti-Aircraft Unit

Immediately, Buna Airfield was strafed and bombed by Allied aircraft flying from Port Moresby, making the airfield too vulnerable for flight operations. Several aircraft were disabled by low level strafing and bombing attacks and were left abandoned along the runway.



On August 28, the remaining Vals were withdrawn. During the afternoon of September 8, the remaining 2nd Kokutai Zeros withdrew. Buna Airfield was used for roughly two weeks before being neutralized by Allied bombing and strafing and untenable.



Although no aircraft remained, anti-aircraft guns continued to defend Buna Airfield against attacking aircraft. The wrecked aircraft on the ground were repeatedly strafed and bombed, in the incorrect belief they were active aircraft


This aircraft below was a hybrid assembled from the wreckage of at least three Zeros captured at Buna Airfield during late December 1942 to early January 1943. The captured Zeros were loaded aboard a barge and shipped to Brisbane then transported to Eagle Farm Airfield.

[img]http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif~origina[l/img]


At Eagle Farm Airfield, this Zero was reconstructed from parts of at least three Zeros including: A6M3 3028 (using the engine) A6M3 3030 (using the main fuselage and wing section) and A6M3 3032 (using the rear fuselage and other components). Plus, parts from many other Zero wrecks captured at Buna Airfield.



This aircraft was possibly designated with an ATIU Reference ID of XJ00. At one time, it appeared to be painted overall gray. Later was painted with American 'star & bar' markings. With the aid of an interpreter and a Japanese pilot prisoner, the personnel were able to create a cockpit check list.

The first test flight was on July 20, 1943, took off piloted by test pilot Captain William O. Farrior flight for 30 minutes and checked the trim. No problems were encountered and no major adjustments were needed except for some trimming.

[img]http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif[~original/img]

Later, it was shipped to the USA for further testing at Wright Field as EB-201 - US Air Force Wright Field. I have not been able to determine the aircrafts final fate.

Mitsubishi A6M3 'Hamp'It is unclear of its fate at the end of the war, likely it was scrapped.  A later report (29 April 1944) from Eglin Field shows they were attempting to fly the HAMP against the P-47 for comparison. However, scored piston walls, bent plugs indicated a new engine was needed[/b][/b]




______________________________________________________
If you score a victory but lose your wingman, you lost the battle.


Last edited by Kyushu J7W on Tue Jul 18 2017, 19:57; edited 3 times in total
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Kyushu J7W

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PostSubject: Re: Marushin Model# S004 A6M3-32 Zero - Q108 - 2nd Kōkūtai, Buna Airfield 1942 - code name Hamp (clipped wing)    Tue Mar 14 2017, 18:15



A6M3 Model 32 Zero Manufacture Number 3042 Tail Q-108 - Built by Mitsubishi during July 1942. had a Houkoku Number of 884 (patriotic presentation or donation number), the donor details are unknown. MArushin shows a number of 878.    People and companies in Japan sponsored aircraft just like people in the USA did . When the Navy received such an aircraft the sponsors name was included on the fuselage side.   Assigned to 2nd Kokutai. Painted olive gray with red tail number, outlined in white. Assigned to the 2nd Kōkūtai, it operated from Buna Airfield (Old Strip).  [b]I will try to get the kanji translated.   Can anyone out there translate it?  Could it be an ancestor of todays Marushin Company sponsored a plane in WWII ?   The anchor looking symbols translate as mountain and the three line symbol in between is for 3 but combinations often mean something else.


b]My thanks to Ryusuke Ishiguro  for this translation.  

Naval donated aircraft was called "報國號" Hokoku-go, and army donated aircraft was called "愛國號"Aikoku-go.  
Hokoku means dedication to the country, and Aikoku means patriotism.  
The following is the list of Hokoku-go.


You can see No. 878 as below , A6M type 32

878  元山三山號 零戦32型
Production number 3035, "2-181"
製造番号3035,"2-181"

Now.
"報國-878" means donated naval aircraft No. 878

"(元山三山號)" means "donated by Mr. Mitsuyama (三山) lives in (元山) Genzan (or Wonson) in Korea.
Now you see this aircraft was donated by a person whose name was Mitsuyama lived in Genzan, Korea.

Marushin only used or chose this aircraft, and they have no relationship with this aircraft.

______________________________________________________
If you score a victory but lose your wingman, you lost the battle.
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Marushin Model# S004 A6M3-32 Zero - Q108 - 2nd Kōkūtai, Buna Airfield 1942 - code name Hamp (clipped wing)
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